summer series: three vocabulary activities

Time to highlight three blog posts focusing on vocabulary revision, recycling and practice. Linguist David Wilkins (1972) wrote: “without grammar very little can be conveyed, without vocabulary nothing can be conveyed”. Let’s have a look at some of my favourite vocabulary activities. Once again, click on the links for the full posts.

In dictation 1 students review words and expressions from previous days by means of a delayed dictation. Then they need to help peers and be helped to come up with the full list of dictated items. They are also given prompts to drill functional language in the process (“Excuse me, can I just ask you something?”/”Sure, go ahead”/ “Cheers”/”No bother”…). More alternative and communicative types of dictation in dictation 2 and dictation 3.

In vocabulary lists I devise a way to keep vocabulary lists for study and revision. Students can do so digitally by using a word processor or Google Docs or simply use pen and paper. Students are instructed to find examples of the focal lexical items and type them or write them and leave gaps. Words may be retrieved by looking at the gapped example or by looking at the translated lexical item. Doing this digitally also allows the creation of hyperlinks to examples on social media or online dictionaries. A really effective way to self manage vocabulary acquisition and, most importantly, use.

In Padlet: practical use #295 I choose a set listening for the students to listen to at home and I ask them to identify useful words and expressions and place them on a Padlet (an online noticeboard, you may also use an online collaborative document like a Google Doc as an alternative, if you want). Then, in class, the students can listen to the recording or watch the video and the words and expressions placed on the Padlet can be explored with guidance from the teacher.

Meet you in a couple of weeks with the last summer series with a selection of reading activities.

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